Derrick Brak

I’ve always loved writing. I was drawn to fiction at an early age when, reading Enid Blyton, I discovered the transporting power of stories. George R.R. Martin wrote that “A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies… The man who never reads lives only one.” Stories have, throughout the ages, been a powerful engine for imagination, empathy and reflection. They shape our lives in a thousand little ways.

 

I tried my hand at writing fiction throughout my childhood. Most of it remains either incomplete, unedited, or just not very good. What I’ve found in recent years is that it’s often more energizing to write about stories than it is to write the stories themselves. Over the same period, I’ve fallen in love with the screen as a medium. Movies and TV coloured the edges of my life as a child, but it wasn’t until I learned more about the craft of filmmaking, especially by studying masters like Stanley Kubrick, that I really engaged with them.

 

The great film critic Roger Ebert once said, “The great movies enlarge us, they civilize us, they make us more decent people.” Movies, like books and every other art form, can be an escape, but they can also be avenues for conversation and growth.

 

I’m interested in those conversations. Movies and TV, more than most forms of art, are a communal experience. We go to cinemas to watch them with strangers, we recommend them to friends, we discuss the latest episodes at work, and we quote The Office in our Tinder bio’s. Conversation is built into these stories, whether it’s a conversation between artist and audience or a discussion between the watchers.

 

My essays will try to do both. No good film or series can be contained in an essay/review, but the experience of watching them can be greatly enhanced. The films we love are great not just because they give us an escape, but because they tap into what makes life so special. Those insights deserve a spotlight.

Derrick Brak is a freelance writer living in Johannesburg, South Africa. He has worked as the production manager on a local short film, and his writing has been published in Bright Wall/Dark Room. He can be reached by email at derrickj.brak@gmail.com or on social media.

Essays

/

Contact

2020 © Derrick Brak

 \ 

Derrick Brak

I’ve always loved writing. I was drawn to fiction at an early age when, reading Enid Blyton, I discovered the transporting power of stories. George R.R. Martin wrote that “A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies… The man who never reads lives only one.” Stories have, throughout the ages, been a powerful engine for imagination, empathy and reflection. They shape our lives in a thousand little ways.

 

I tried my hand at writing fiction throughout my childhood. Most of it remains either incomplete, unedited, or just not very good. What I’ve found in recent years is that it’s often more energizing to write about stories than it is to write the stories themselves. Over the same period, I’ve fallen in love with the screen as a medium. Movies and TV coloured the edges of my life as a child, but it wasn’t until I learned more about the craft of filmmaking, especially by studying masters like Stanley Kubrick, that I really engaged with them.

 

The great film critic Roger Ebert once said, “The great movies enlarge us, they civilize us, they make us more decent people.” Movies, like books and every other art form, can be an escape, but they can also be avenues for conversation and growth.

 

I’m interested in those conversations. Movies and TV, more than most forms of art, are a communal experience. We go to cinemas to watch them with strangers, we recommend them to friends, we discuss the latest episodes at work, and we quote The Office in our Tinder bio’s. Conversation is built into these stories, whether it’s a conversation between artist and audience or a discussion between the watchers.

 

My essays will try to do both. No good film or series can be contained in an essay/review, but the experience of watching them can be greatly enhanced. The films we love are great not just because they give us an escape, but because they tap into what makes life so special. Those insights deserve a spotlight.

Derrick Brak is a freelance writer living in Johannesburg, South Africa. He has worked as the production manager on a local short film, and his writing has been published in Bright Wall/Dark Room. He can be reached by email at derrickj.brak@gmail.com or on social media.

Essays

/

Contact

2020 © Derrick Brak

 \ 

Derrick Brak

I’ve always loved writing. I was drawn to fiction at an early age when, reading Enid Blyton, I discovered the transporting power of stories. George R.R. Martin wrote that “A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies… The man who never reads lives only one.” Stories have, throughout the ages, been a powerful engine for imagination, empathy and reflection. They shape our lives in a thousand little ways.

 

I tried my hand at writing fiction throughout my childhood. Most of it remains either incomplete, unedited, or just not very good. What I’ve found in recent years is that it’s often more energizing to write about stories than it is to write the stories themselves. Over the same period, I’ve fallen in love with the screen as a medium. Movies and TV coloured the edges of my life as a child, but it wasn’t until I learned more about the craft of filmmaking, especially by studying masters like Stanley Kubrick, that I really engaged with them.

 

The great film critic Roger Ebert once said, “The great movies enlarge us, they civilize us, they make us more decent people.” Movies, like books and every other art form, can be an escape, but they can also be avenues for conversation and growth.

 

I’m interested in those conversations. Movies and TV, more than most forms of art, are a communal experience. We go to cinemas to watch them with strangers, we recommend them to friends, we discuss the latest episodes at work, and we quote The Office in our Tinder bio’s. Conversation is built into these stories, whether it’s a conversation between artist and audience or a discussion between the watchers.

 

My essays will try to do both. No good film or series can be contained in an essay/review, but the experience of watching them can be greatly enhanced. The films we love are great not just because they give us an escape, but because they tap into what makes life so special. Those insights deserve a spotlight.

Derrick Brak is a freelance writer living in Johannesburg, South Africa. He has worked as the production manager on a local short film, and his writing has been published in Bright Wall/Dark Room. He can be reached by email at derrickj.brak@gmail.com or on social media.

Essays

/

Contact

2020 © Derrick Brak

\
 

Derrick Brak

I’ve always loved writing. I was drawn to fiction at an early age when, reading Enid Blyton, I discovered the transporting power of stories. George R.R. Martin wrote that “A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies… The man who never reads lives only one.” Stories have, throughout the ages, been a powerful engine for imagination, empathy and reflection. They shape our lives in a thousand little ways.

 

I tried my hand at writing fiction throughout my childhood. Most of it remains either incomplete, unedited, or just not very good. What I’ve found in recent years is that it’s often more energizing to write about stories than it is to write the stories themselves. Over the same period, I’ve fallen in love with the screen as a medium. Movies and TV coloured the edges of my life as a child, but it wasn’t until I learned more about the craft of filmmaking, especially by studying masters like Stanley Kubrick, that I really engaged with them.

 

The great film critic Roger Ebert once said, “The great movies enlarge us, they civilize us, they make us more decent people.” Movies, like books and every other art form, can be an escape, but they can also be avenues for conversation and growth.

 

I’m interested in those conversations. Movies and TV, more than most forms of art, are a communal experience. We go to cinemas to watch them with strangers, we recommend them to friends, we discuss the latest episodes at work, and we quote The Office in our Tinder bio’s. Conversation is built into these stories, whether it’s a conversation between artist and audience or a discussion between the watchers.

 

My essays will try to do both. No good film or series can be contained in an essay/review, but the experience of watching them can be greatly enhanced. The films we love are great not just because they give us an escape, but because they tap into what makes life so special. Those insights deserve a spotlight.

Derrick Brak is a freelance writer living in Johannesburg, South Africa. He has worked as the production manager on a local short film, and his writing has been published in Bright Wall/Dark Room. He can be reached by email at derrickj.brak@gmail.com or on social media.

Essays

/

Contact

2020 © Derrick Brak

 \ 

Derrick Brak

 

I’ve always loved writing. I was drawn to fiction at an early age when, reading Enid Blyton, I discovered the transporting power of stories. George R.R. Martin wrote that “A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies… The man who never reads lives only one.” Stories have, throughout the ages, been a powerful engine for imagination, empathy and reflection. They shape our lives in a thousand little ways.

 

I tried my hand at writing fiction throughout my childhood. Most of it remains either incomplete, unedited, or just not very good. What I’ve found in recent years is that it’s often more energizing to write about stories than it is to write the stories themselves. Over the same period, I’ve fallen in love with the screen as a medium. Movies and TV coloured the edges of my life as a child, but it wasn’t until I learned more about the craft of filmmaking, especially by studying masters like Stanley Kubrick, that I really engaged with them.

 

The great film critic Roger Ebert once said, “The great movies enlarge us, they civilize us, they make us more decent people.” Movies, like books and every other art form, can be an escape, but they can also be avenues for conversation and growth.

 

I’m interested in those conversations. Movies and TV, more than most forms of art, are a communal experience. We go to cinemas to watch them with strangers, we recommend them to friends, we discuss the latest episodes at work, and we quote The Office in our Tinder bio’s. Conversation is built into these stories, whether it’s a conversation between artist and audience or a discussion between the watchers.

 

My essays will try to do both. No good film or series can be contained in an essay/review, but the experience of watching them can be greatly enhanced. The films we love are great not just because they give us an escape, but because they tap into what makes life so special. Those insights deserve a spotlight.

Derrick Brak is a freelance writer living in Johannesburg, South Africa. He has worked as the production manager on a local short film, and his writing has been published in Bright Wall/Dark Room. He can be reached by email at derrickj.brak@gmail.com or on social media.

2020 © Derrick Brak

 \ 